ORDER X

EXAMINATION OF PARTIES BY THE COURT

1. Ascertainment whether allegations in pleadings are admitted or denied.— At the first hearing of the suit the Court shall ascertain from each party or his pleader whether he admits or denies such allegations of fact as are made in the plaint or written statement (if any) of the opposite party, and as are not expressly or by necessary implication admitted or denied by the party against whom they are made. The Court shall record such admissions and denials.

1[1A. Direction of the court to opt for any one mode of alternative dispute resolution.—After recording the admissions and denials, the court shall direct the parties to the suit to opt either mode of the settlement outside the court as specified in sub-section (1) of section 89. On the option of the parties, the court shall fix the date of appearance before such forum or authority as may be opted by the parties.

1B. Appearance before the conciliatory forum or authority.—Where a suit is referred under rule 1A, the parties shall appear before such forum or authority for conciliation of the suit.

1C. Appearance before the court consequent to the failure of efforts of conciliation.—Where a suit is referred under rule 1A and the presiding officer of conciliation forum or authority is satisfied that it would not be proper in the interest of justice to proceed with the matter further, then, it shall refer the matter again to the court and direct the parties to appear before the court on the date fixed by it.]

1. Inserted by Act No. 46 of 1999. S. 20 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

1[2. Oral examination of party, or companion of party.— (1) At the first hearing of the suit, the Court-

(a) Shall, with a view to elucidating matters in controversy in the suit examine orally such of the parties to the suit appearing in person or present in Court, as it deems fit; and

(b) May orally examine any person, able to answer any material question relating to the suit, by whom any party appearing in person or present in Court or his pleader is accompanied.

(2) At any subsequent hearing, the Court may orally examine any party appearing in person or present in Court, or any person, able to answer any material question relating to the suit, by whom such party or his pleader is accompanied.

(3) The Court may, if it thinks fit, put in the course of an examination under this Rule questions suggested by either party.]

1. Substituted by Act No. 104 or 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

13. Substance of examination to be written.The substance of the examination shall be reduced to writing by the Judge, and shall form part of the record.

1. See the Oudh Court Act, 1925 (U.P. 4 of 1925) for non applicability of the Rule to the Chief Court of Oudh.

4. Consequence of refusal or inability of pleader to answer.—(1) Where the pleader of any party who appears by a pleader or any such person accompanying a pleader as is referred to in Rule 2, refuses or is unable to answer any material question relating to the suit which the Court is of opinion that the party whom he represents ought to answer, and is likely to be able to answer if interrogated in person, the Court 1[may postpone the hearing of the suit to a day not later than seven days from the date of first hearing] and direct that such party shall appear in person on such day.

(2) If such party fails without lawful excuse to appear in person on the day so appointed, the Court may pronounce judgment against him, or make such order in relation to the suit as it thinks fit.

1. Substituted by Act No. 46 of 1999, S. 20 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

ORDER XI

DISCOVERY AND INSPECTION

1. Discovery by interrogatories.— In any suit the plaintiff or defendant by leave of the Court may deliver interrogatories in writing for the examination of the opposite parties or any one or more of such parties and such interrogatories when delivered shall have a note at the foot thereof stating which of such interrogatories each of such persons is required to answer : Provided that no party shall deliver more than one set of interrogatories to the same party without an order for that purpose : Provided also that interrogatories which do not relate to any matters in question in the suit be deemed irrelevant, notwithstanding that they might be admissible on the oral cross-examination of a witness.

2. Particular interrogatories to be submitted.— On an application for leave to deliver interrogatories, the particular interrogatories proposed to be delivered shall be submitted to the Court 1[and that court shall decide within seven days from the day of filing of the said application]. In deciding upon such application, the Court shall take into account any offer, which may be made by the party sought to be interrogated to deliver particulars, or to make admissions, or to produce documents relating to the matters in question, or any of them, and leave shall be given as to such only of the interrogatories submitted as the Court shall consider necessary either for disposing fairly of the suit or for saving costs.

1. Inserted by Act No. 46 of 1999, S. 21 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

3. Costs of interrogatories.— In adjusting the costs of the suit inquiry shall at the instance of any party be made into the propriety of exhibiting such interrogatories, and if it is the opinion of the taxing officer or of the Court, either with or without an application for inquiry, that such interrogatories have been exhibited unreasonably, vexatiously, or at improper length, the cost occasioned by the said interrogatories and the answers thereto shall be paid in any event by the party in fault.

4. Form of interrogatories.— Interrogatories shall be in Form No. 2 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require.

5. Corporations.— Where any party to a suit is a corporation or a body of persons, whether incorporated or not, empowered by law to sue or be sued, whether in its own name or in the name of any officer or other person, any opposite party may apply for an order allowing him to deliver interrogatories to any member or officer of such corporation or body, and an order may be made accordingly.

6. Objections to interrogatories by answer.— Any objection to answering any interrogatory on the ground that it is scandalous or irrelevant or not exhibited bona fide for the purpose of the suit, or that the matters inquired into are not sufficiently material at that stage, 1[or on the ground of privilege or any other ground], may be taken in the affidavit in answer.

1. Substituted by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

7. Setting aside and striking out interrogatories.—Any interrogatories may be set aside on the ground that they have been exhibited unreasonably or vexatiously, or struck out on the ground that they are prolix, oppressive, unnecessary or scandalous; and any application for this purpose may be made within seven days after service of the interrogatories.

8. Affidavit in answer, filing.—Interrogatories shall be answered by affidavit to be filed within ten days or within such other time as the Court may allow.

9. Form of affidavit in answer.—An affidavit in answer to interrogatories shall be in Form No. 3 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require.

10. No exception to be taken.—No exceptions shall be taken to any affidavit in answer, but the sufficiency or otherwise of any such affidavit objected to as insufficient shall be determined by the Court.

11. Order to answer or answer further.—Where any person interrogated omits to answer, or answer insufficiently, the party interrogating may apply to the Court for an order requiring him to answer, or to answer further, as the case may be. And an order may be made requiring him to answer or answer further, either by affidavit or by viva voce examination as the Court may direct.

12. Application for discovery of documents.—Any party may, without filing any affidavit, apply to the Court for an order directing any other party to any suit to make discovery on oath of the documents which are or have been in his possession or power, relating to any matter in question therein. On the hearing of such application the Court may either refuse or adjourn the same, if satisfied that such discovery is not necessary, or not necessary at that stage of the suit, or make such order, either generally or limited to certain classes of documents, as may, in its discretion be thought fit :

Provided that discovery shall not be ordered when and so far as the Court shall be of opinion that it is not necessary either for disposing fairly of the suit or for saying costs.

13. Affidavit of documents.— The affidavit to be made by a party against whom such order as is mentioned in the last preceding Rule has been made, shall specify which (if any) of the documents therein mentioned he objects to produce, and it shall be in Form No. 5 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require.

14. Production of documents.—It shall be lawful for the Court, at any time during the pendency of any suit, to order the production by any party thereto, upon oath of such of the documents in his possession or power, relating to any matter in question in such suit, as the Court shall think right; and the Court may deal with such documents, when produced, in such manner as shall appear just.

15. Inspection of documents referred to in pleadings or affidavits.—Every party to a suit shall be entitled 1[at or before the settlement of issues] to give notice to any other party, in whose pleadings or affidavits reference is made to any document 2[or who has entered any document in any list annexed to his pleadings.] or produce such document for the inspection of the party giving such notice, or of his pleader, and to permit him or them to take copies thereof; and any party not complying with such notice shall not afterwards be at liberty to put any such document in evidence on his behalf in such suit unless he shall satisfy the Court that such document relates only to his own title, he being a defendant to the suit, or that he had some other cause or excuse which the Court shall deem sufficient for not complying with such notice, in which case the Court may allow the same to be put in evidence on such terms as to costs and otherwise as the Court shall think fit.

1. Substituted by Act No. 46 of 1999, S. 21 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

2. Inserted by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

16. Notice to produce.—Notice to any party to produce arty documents referred to in his pleading or affidavits shall be in Form No. 7 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require.

17. Time for inspection when notice given.—The party to whom such notice is given shall, within ten days from the receipt of such notice, deliver to the party giving the same a notice stating a time within three days from the delivery thereof at which the documents, or such of them as he does not object to produce, may be inspected at the office of his pleader, or in the case of bankers’ books or other books of account or books in constant use for the purposes of any trade or business, at their usual place of custody, and stating which (if any) of the documents he objects to produce, and on what ground. Such notice shall be in Form No. 8 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require.

18. Order for inspection.(1) Where the party served with notice under Rule 15 omits to give such notice of a time for inspection or objects to give inspection, or offers inspection elsewhere than at the office of his pleader, the Court may, on the application of the party desiring it, make an order for inspection in such place and in such manner as it may think fit :

Provided that the order shall not be made when and so far as the Court shall be of opinion that, it is not necessary either for disposing fairly of the suit or for saving costs.

(2) Any application to inspect documents, except such as are referred to in the pleadings, particulars or affidavits of the party against whom the application is made or disclosed in his affidavit of documents, shall be founded upon an affidavit showing of what inspection is sought, that the party applying is entitled to inspect them, and that they are in the possession or power of the other party. The Court shall not make such order for inspection of such documents when and so far as the Court shall be of opinion that it is not necessary either for disposing fairly of the suit or for saving costs.

19. Verified copies.—(1) Where inspection of’ any business books is applied for, the Court may, if it thinks fit, instead of ordering inspection of the original books, order a copy of any entries therein to be furnished and verified by the affidavit of some person who has examined the copy with the original entries, and such affidavit shall state whether or not there are in the original book any and what erasures, interlineations or alterations: Provided that, not withstanding that such copy has been supplied, the Court may order inspection of the book from which the copy was made.

(2) Where on an application for an order for inspection privilege is claimed for any document, it shall be lawful for the Court to inspect the document for the purpose of deciding as to the validity of the claim of privilege 1[unless the document relates to matters of State].

(3) The Court may, on the application of any party to a suit at any time, and whether an affidavit of documents shall or shall not have already been ordered or made, make an order requiring any other party to state by affidavit whether any one or more specific documents, to be specified in the application, is or are, or has or have at any time been, in his possession or power; and, if not then in his possession, when he parted with the same and what has become thereof. Such application shall be made on an affidavit stating that in the belief of the deponent the party against whom the application is made has, or has at some time had, in his possession or power the document or documents specified in the application, and that they relate to the matters in question in the suit, or to some of them.

1. Inserted by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f.. 1st February, 1977.

20. Premature discovery.—Where the party from whom discovery of any kind or inspection is sought objects to the same, or any part thereof, the Court may if satisfied that the right to the discovery or inspection sought depends on the determination of any issue or question in dispute in the suit, or that for any other reason it is desirable that any issue or question in dispute in the suit should be determined before deciding upon the right to the discovery or inspection, order that such issue or question be determined first, and reserve the question as to the discovery or inspection.

21. Non-compliance with order for discovery.—1[(1)] Where any party fails to comply with any owner to answer interrogatories, or for discovery or inspection of document, he shall, if a plaintiff, be liable to have his suit dismissed for want of prosecution, and, if a defendant, to have his defence, if any struck out, and to be placed in the same position as if he had not defended, and the party interrogating or seeking discovery or inspection may apply to the Court for an order to that effect and 2[an order may be made on such application accordingly, after notice to the parties and after giving them a reasonable opportunity of being heard.]

3[(2) Where an order is made under sub-rule (1) dismissing any suit, the plaintiff shall be precluded from bringing a fresh suit on the same cause of action.]

1. Rule 21 renumbered as sub-rule (1) of that Rule by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

2. Substituted by Act No. 104 of 1976, for the words “an order may be made accordingly”, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

3. Inserted by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

22. Using answers to interrogatories at trial.—Any party may, at the trial of a suit, use in evidence any one or more of the answers or any part of an answer of the opposite party to interrogatories without putting in the others or the whole of such answer: Provided always that in such case the Court may look at the whole of the answers, and if it shall be of opinion that any others of them are so connected with those put in that the last-mentioned answers ought not to be used without them, it may direct them to be put in.

23. Order to apply to minors.—This Order shall apply to minor plaintiffs and defendants, and to the next friends and guardians for the suit of persons under disability.

ORDER XII

ADMISSION

1. Notice of admission of case.—Any party to a suit may give notice, by his pleading, or otherwise in writing, that he admits the truth of the whole or any part of the case of any other party.

2. Notice to admit documents.—Either party may call upon the other party 1[to admit, within 2[seven] days from the date of service of the notice any document,] saying all just exceptions; and in case of refusal or neglect to admit, after such notice, the costs of proving any such document shall be paid by the party so neglecting or refusing, whatever the result of the suit may be, unless the Court otherwise directs; and no costs of proving any document shall be allowed unless such notice is given, except where the omission to give the notice is, in the opinion of the Court, a saving of expense.

1. Substituted by Act No. 104 of 1976, for the words “to admit any document”, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

1. Substituted by Act No. 46 of 1999, S. 22 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

1[2A. Document to be deemed to be admitted if not divided after service of notice to admit documents.—(1) Every document which a party is called upon to admit, if not denied specifically or by necessary implication, or stated to be not admitted in the pleading of that party or in his reply to the notice to admit documents, shall be deemed to be admitted except as against a person under a disability:

Provided that the Court may, in its discretion and for reasons to be recorded, require any document so admitted to be proved otherwise than by such admission.

(2) Where a party unreasonably neglects or refuses to admit a document after the service on him of the notice to admit documents, the Court may direct him to pay costs to the other party by way of compensation.]

1. Inserted by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

3. Form of notice.—A notice to admit documents shall be in Form No. 9 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require.

1[3A. Power of Court to record admission.—Notwithstanding that no notice to admit documents has been given under Rule 2, the Court may, at any stage of the proceeding before it, of its own motion, call upon any party to admit any document and shall in such a case, record whether the party admits or refuses or neglects to admit such document.]

1. Inserted by Act No. 66 of 1956.

4. Notice to admit acts.—Any party, may, by notice in writing, at any time not later than nine days before the day fixed for the hearing, call on any other party to admit, for the purposes of the suit only, any specific fact, or facts mentioned in such notice. And in case of refusal or neglect to admit the same within six days after service of such notice, or within such further time as may be allowed by the Court, the costs of proving such fact or facts shall be paid by the party so neglecting or refusing, whatever the result of the suit may be, unless the Court otherwise directs:

Provided that any admission made in pursuance of such notice is to be deemed to be made only for the purposes of the particular suit, and not as an admission to be used against the party on any other occasion or in the favour of any person other than the party giving the notice :

1[* * *].

1. Second Priviso omitted by Act No. 46 of 1999 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

5. Form of admissions—A notice to admit facts shall be in Form No. 10 in Appendix C, and admissions of facts shall be in Form No. 11 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require.

1[6. Judgement on admissions.—(1) Where admissions of fact have been made either in the pleading or otherwise, whether orally or in writing, the Court may at any stage of the suit, either on the application of any party or of its own motion and without waiting for the determination of any other question between the parties, make such order or give such judgment as it may think fit, having regard to such admissions.

(2) Whenever a judgment is pronounced under sub-rule (J) a decree shall be drawn up in accordance with the judgment and the decree shall bear the date on which the judgment was pronounced.]

1. Substituted by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

7. Affidavit of signature.—An affidavit of the pleader or his clerk, of the due signature of any admissions made in pursuance of any notice to admit documents or facts, shall be sufficient evidence of such admissions, if evidence thereof is required.

8. Notice to produce documents.—Notice to produce documents shall be in Form No. 12 in Appendix C, with such variations as circumstances may require. An affidavit of the pleader, or his clerk, of the service of any notice to produce, and of the time when it was served, with a copy of the notice to produce, shall in all cases be sufficient evidence of the service of the notice, and of the time when it was served.

9. Costs.—If a notice to admit or produce specifies documents which are not necessary, the costs occasioned thereby shall be borne by the party giving such notice.

ORDER XIII

PRODUCTION, IMPOUNDING AND RETURN OF DOCUMENTS

1[1. Original documents to be produced at or before the settlement of issues.—(1) The parties or their pleader shall produce on or before the settlement of issues, all the documentary evidence in original where the copies thereof have been filed along with plaint or written statement.

(2) The court shall receive the documents so produced:

Provided that they are accompanied by an accurate list thereof prepared in such form as the High Court directs.

(3) Nothing in sub-rule (1) shall apply to documents—

(a) produced for the cross-examination of the witnesses of the other party; or

(b) handed over to a witness merely to refresh his memory.]

1. Substituted for Rules 1 and 2 by Act No. 46 of 1999, S. 23 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

3. Rejection of irrelevant or inadmissible documents.—The Court may at any stage of the suit reject any document, which it considers irrelevant or otherwise inadmissible, recording the grounds of such rejection.

4. Endorsements on documents admitted in evidence.—(1) Subject to the provisions of the next following sub-rule, there shall be endorsed on every document which has been admitted in evidence in the suit the following particulars, namely:—

(a) The number and title of the suit,

(b) The name of the person producing the document,

(c) The date on which it was produced, and

(d) A statement of its having been so admitted,

And the endorsement shall be signed or initialled by the Judge.

(2) Where a document so admitted is an entry in a book, account or record, and a copy thereof has been substituted for the original under the next following Rule, the particulars aforesaid shall be endorsed on the copy and the endorsement thereon shall be signed or initialled by the Judge.

5. Endorsements on copies of admitted entries in books, accounts and records.—(1) Save in so far as is otherwise provided by the Bankers’ Books Evidence Act, 1891 (18 of 1891) where a document admitted in evidence in the suit is an entry in a letter-book or a shop-book or other account in current use, the party on whose behalf the book or account is produced may furnish a copy of the entry.

(2) Where such a document is an entry in a public record produced from a public office or by a public officer, or an entry in a book or account belonging to a person other than a party on whose behalf the book or account is produced, the Court may require a copy of the entry to be furnished-

(a) Where the record, book or account is produced on behalf of a party, then by that party, or

(b) Where the record, book or account is produced in obedience to an order of the Court acting of its own motion, then by either or any party.

(3) Where a copy of an entry is furnished. under the foregoing provisions of this Rule, the Court shall, after causing the copy to be examined, compared and certified in manner mentioned in Rule 17 of Order VII, mark the entry and cause the book, account or record in which it occurs to be returned to the person producing it.

6. Endorsements on documents rejected as inadmissible in evidence.—Where a document relied on as evidence by either party is considered by the Court to be inadmissible in evidence, there shall be endorsed thereon the particulars mentioned in clauses (a), (b) and (c) of Rule 4, sub-rule (1) together with a statement of its having been rejected, and the endorsement shall be signed or initialled by the Judge.

7. Recording of admitted and return of rejected documents.—(1) Every document which has been admitted in evidence, or a copy thereof where a copy has been substituted for the original under Rule 5, shall form part of the record of the suit.

(2) Documents not admitted in evidence shall not form part of the record and shall be returned to the persons respectively producing them.

8. Court may order any document to be impounded.—Notwithstanding anything contained in Rule 5 or Rule 7 of this Order or in Rule 17 of Order VII, the Court may, if it sees sufficient cause, direct any document or book produced before it in any suit to be impounded and kept in the custody of an officer of the Court, for such period and subject to such conditions as the Court thinks fit.

9. Return of admitted documents.(1) Any person, whether a party to the suit or not, desirous of receiving back any document produced by him in the suit and placed on the record shall, unless the document is impounded under Rule 8, be entitled to receive back the same.—

(a) Where the suit is one in which an appeal is not allowed, when the suit has been disposed of, and

(b) Where the suit is one in which an appeal is allowed, when the Court is satisfied that the time for preferring an appeal has elapsed and that no appeal has been preferred or, if an appeal has been preferred, when the appeal has been disposed of:

1[Provided that a document may be returned at any time earlier than that prescribed by this Rule if the person applying therefor-

(a) Delivers to the proper officer for being substituted for the original. -

(i) In the case of a party to the suit, a certified copy, and

(ii) In the case of any other person, an ordinary copy which has been examined, compared and certified in the manner mentioned in sub-rule (2) of Rule 17 of Order VII, and

(b) Undertakes to produce the original, if required to do so:]

Provided also, that no document shall be returned with, by force of the decree, has become wholly void or useless.

(2) On the return of a document admitted in evidence, a receipt shall be given by the person receiving it.

1. Substituted by Act No. 104 of 1976, for the proviso, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

10. Court may send for papers from its own records or from other Courts.—(1) The Court may of its own motion, and may in its discretion upon the application of any of the parties to a suit, send for, either from its own records or from any other Court, the record of any other suit or proceeding, and inspect the same.

(2) Every application made under this Rule shall (unless the Court otherwise directs) be supported by an affidavit showing how the record is material to the suit in which the application is made, and that the applicant cannot without unreasonable delay or expense obtain a duly authenticated copy of the record or of such portion thereof as the applicant requires, or that the production of the original is necessary for the purposes of justice.

(3) Nothing contained in this Rule shall be deemed to enable the Court to use in evidence any document which under the law of evidence would be inadmissible in the suit.

11. Provision as to documents applied to material objects.—The provisions therein contained as to documents shall, so far as may be, apply to all other material objects producible as evidence.

ORDER XIV

SETTLEMENT OF ISSUES AND DETERMINATION OF SUIT ON ISSUES OF LAW OR ON ISSUES AGREED UPON

1. Framing of issues.—(1) Issues arise when a material proposition of fact or law is affirmed by the one party and denied by the other.

(2) Material propositions are those propositions of law or fact, which a plaintiff must allege in order to show a right to sue or a defendant must allege in order to constitute his defence.

(3) Each material proposition affirmed by one-party and denied by the other shall form the subject of distinct issue.

(4) Issues are of two kinds:

(a) Issues of fact,

(b) Issues of law.

(5) At the first hearing of the suit the Court shall, after reading the plaint and the written statements, if any, and 1[after examination under Rule 2 of Order X and after hearing the parties or their pleaders], ascertain upon what material propositions of fact or of law the parties are at variance, and shall thereupon proceed to frame and record the issues on which the right decision of the case appears to depend.

(6) Nothing in this Rule requires the Court to frame and record issues where the defendant at the first hearing of the suit makes no defence.

1. Substituted by Act No. 104 of 1976, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

1[2. Court to pronounce judgment on all issues.—(1) Notwithstanding that a case may be disposed of on a preliminary issue, the Court shall, subject to the provisions of sub-rule (2), pronounce judgment on all issues.

(2) Where issues both of law and of fact arise in the same suit, and the Court is of opinion that the case or any part thereof may be disposed of on an issue of law only, it may try that issue first if that issue relates to-

(a) The jurisdiction of the Court, or

(b) A bar to the suit created by any law for the time being in force,

And for that purpose may, if it thinks fit, postpone the settlement of the other issues until after that issue has been determined, and may deal with the suit in accordance with the decision on that issue.]

1. Substituted by Act No. 104 of 1976, for former Rule 2, w.e.f. 1st February, 1977.

3. Materials from which issues may be framed.—The Court may frame the issues from all or any of the following materials:—

(a) Allegations made on oath by the parties, or by any persons present on their behalf, or made by the pleaders of such parties;

(b) Allegations made in the pleadings or in answers to interrogatories delivered in the suit;

(c) The contents of documents produced by either party.

4. Court may examine witnesses or documents before framing issues.—Where the Court is of opinion that the issues cannot be correctly framed without the examination of some person not before the Court or without the inspection of some document not produced in the suit, it 1[may adjourn the framing of issues to a day not later than seven days], and may (subject to any law for the time being in force) compel the attendance of any person or the production of any document by the person in whose possession or power it is by summons or other process.

1. Substituted by Act No. 46 of 1999, S. 24 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

1[5. Power to amend and strike out, issues.— (I) The Court may at any time before passing a decree amend the issues or frame additional issues on such terms as it thinks fit, and all such amendments o additional issues as may be necessary for determining the matters in controvesy between the parties shall be so made or framed.

(2) The Court may also, at any time before passing a decree, strike out any issues that appear to it to be wrongly framed or introduced.]

1. Substituted by Act No. 22 of 2002. S. 11 (w.e.f. 1-7-2002).

6. Questions of fact or law may byagreement be stated in form of issues.—Where the parties to a suit are agreed as to the question of fact or of law to be decided between them, they may state the same in the form of an issue, and enter into an agreement in writing that, upon the finding of the Court in the affirmative or the negative of such issue.—

(a) A sum of money specified in the agreement or to be ascertained by the Court, or in such manner as the Court may direct, shall be paid by one of the parties to the other of them, or that are of them be declared entitled to some right or subject some liability specified in the agreement:

(b) Some property specified in the agreement and in dispute in the suit shall be delivered by one of the parties to the other of them, or as that other may direct; or

(c) One or more of the parties shall do or abstain from doing some particular Act specified in the agreement and relating to the matter in dispute.

7. Court, if satisfied that agreement was executed in good faith, may pronounce judgement.Where the Court is satisfied, after making such inquiry, as it deems proper. –

(a) That the agreement was duly executed by the parties;

(b) That they have a substantial interest in the decision of such question as aforesaid, and

(c) That the same is fit to be tried and decided,

It shall proceed to record and try the issue and state its finding or decision thereon in the same manner as if the issue had been framed by the Court.

And shall, upon the finding or decision on such issue, pronounce judgment according to the terms of the agreement; and, upon the judgment so pronounced a decree shall follow.

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Article 54 of the Limitation Act, 1963 (36 of 1963) reads as follows: “For Specific performance of a contract: Three years The date fixed for the performance, or, if no such date is fixed, when the plaintiff has notice that performance is refused.”= the apex Court in Ahmmadsahb Abdul Mila vs. Bibijan[1], wherein it was held that the date fixed for the performance of the contract should be a specified date in the calendar, and submitted that since no specified date in the calendar for performance of the contract is mentioned in the agreement of sale, the second limb of Article 54 of the Limitation Act is applicable. ; whether the suit is barred by limitation or not becomes a tribal issue and when there is a tribal issue, the lower Court ought not to have rejected the plaint at the threshold. In view of the same, order, dated 27-01-2012, in CFR.No.90 of 2012, passed by the Additional Senior Civil Judge, Ongole, (FAC) Senior Civil Judge, Darsi, is, hereby, set aside. The Appeal is allowed accordingly.

Or.18, rule 17 and sec.151 C.P.C - petition filed for reopen and examination of the executant of Ex.A1 the sale deed to fill up the lacuna in evidence pointed out at the time of arguments not maintainable = Shaik Gousiya Begum. ..Petitioner Shaik Hussan and others.... Respondents = Published in http://judis.nic.in/judis_andhra/qrydisp.aspx?filename=10515

Order 39 Rules 1 and 2 CPC. plaintiff has to prove his title and possession how he came into possession prima faice , in the absence of the same, not entitled for interim injunction = The questions as to whether the lease deed was properly stamped and whether the stamp paper on which it was typed can be said to have been procured through proper source, need to be dealt with at the stage of trial.; The suit filed by the 1st respondent, is the one for injunction simplicitor in respect of an item of immovable property. He has also filed an application under Order 39 Rules 1 and 2 CPC. Basically, it was for the 1st respondent to establish that he is in possession and enjoyment of the property and that he derived the same through lawful means, particularly when he did not contend that he encroached upon the property.= assumptions of facts against to the contents of crucial third party by misreading the same- it is just un-understandable as to how the trial Court gathered the impression that Anuradha stated that there was a meeting of Board of Directors, where it was decided to lease the property to the appellants. - the trial Court itself was not clear as to whether the appellant is the lessee or a Manager or is working under any other arrangement. - The important findings that have a bearing upon the valuable rights of the parties cannot be based upon such uncertain and unverified facts. One of the cardinal principles in the matter of examining the applications filed under Order 39 Rules 1 and 2 CPC is that a party claiming that relief must come to the Court with clean hands. Prima facie, we find that there are no bona fides, much less consistency on the part of the 1st respondent, in his effort to get the order of temporary injunction. The trial Court has misread the evidence and misinterpreted the facts borne out by the record.